Improved Clinical Outcomes With Remote Monitoring

Remote monitoring has been associated with improved survival. Patients with high remote monitoring adherence see a 53-percent greater survival than patients with low remote monitoring adherence and a 140-percent greater survival than patients not using remote monitoring at all. Additional studies have shown the following clinical outcomes:

  • 2.4X greater probability of survival
  • 79% reduction in time to detection of clinical events
  • 66% reduction in hospitalizations for AF or stroke admissions
  • 25% reduction in CHF admissions for ICD/CRT-D patients
  • 50% reduction in relative risk of death
  • 34% reduction in all-cause mortality over 3 years for ICD/CRT-D patients
  • 27% reduction in all-cause mortality over 3 years for pacemaker patients

ENABLING EARLY INTERVENTION OF AF TO HELP YOU MINIMIZE THE RISK OF STROKE


ATRIAL FIBRILLATION IS RELATED TO AN INCREASED RISK OF STROKE
While our clinical evidence shows a range of benefits for patients who properly utilize remote monitoring, our clinical studies demonstrate especially strong evidence for the role of remote monitoring in early stroke intervention.

Medical experts have known about the strong relationship between atrial fibrillation (AF) and stroke since the 1970s. Early detection of AF allows for early intervention. Remote monitoring can enable early intervention, allowing for appropriate therapy to minimize the risk of stroke.

  • Chronic AF is related to an increased risk of stroke.
  • Paroxysmal AF is related to an increased risk of stroke.
  • Subclinical AF is related to an increased risk of stroke.

    EARLY INTERVENTION OF STROKE THROUGH TIMELY NOTIFICATION OF AF

    Implanted devices allow health care professionals to assess the burden of AF by tracking the number and duration of symptomatic and asymptomatic AF episodes.

    With the information provided by such devices, coupled with remote care, you may detect subclinical episodes, which may result in early intervention and potentially improved outcomes. The following studies summarize the potential benefit of remote care.

    • In the CONNECT study, median time from clinical event to clinical decision per patient was reduced from 22 days in the in-office arm to 4.6 days in the remote arm (p < 0.001).
    • In the TRUST trial, median time to evaluation was < 2 days in the home monitoring group, compared to 36 days in the conventional (scheduled in-office follow-up) group (p < 0.001).
    • In the ALTITUDE survival study, annual and total survival was significantly better in patients who transmitted device information to the network (remote care), and comparative survival data for 10,272 matched patients implanted with ICD and CRT-D devices on and off the network showed that remote care was associated with a 50% relative reduction in the risk of death (p < 0.001).

      EFFICACY OF STROKE PREVENTION

      Early intervention with appropriate pharmacological therapy in AF can reduce the risk of stroke. Numerous clinical trials have provided an extensive evidence base for the use of antithrombotic therapy in AF. A meta-analysis of 29 trials including 28,044 participants was conducted to characterize the efficacy and safety of antithrombotic agents for stroke prevention in patients who have AF. Of these trials, six evaluated the effect of adjusted-dose warfarin and cumulatively showed that adjusted-dose warfarin reduced stroke by 64 percent.